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Guidelines and Resources to Build an OSHA Training Program

Updated: Mar 25, 2023


OSHA Training Resources

OSHA, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, allows employers to develop their own training programs. However, these programs must meet certain requirements to be considered compliant with OSHA regulations.


OSHA requires employers to provide training to employees on specific hazards and safety procedures relevant to their job functions. The training must be provided in a language and format that is understandable to the employees, and must be conducted by qualified trainers.


Employers can develop their own training programs, as long as the training content meets or exceeds OSHA's training requirements. This means that the employer must identify the hazards that employees may be exposed to in their workplace, and develop training that addresses those hazards.


Employers may also use outside resources, such as OSHA training materials or third-party trainers, to supplement or enhance their own training programs.


It is important to note that employers are responsible for ensuring that their training programs are effective in protecting employees from workplace hazards. If OSHA determines that an employer's training program is inadequate, the employer may face penalties and citations. Therefore, it is important to ensure that any training program meets OSHA's requirements and is effective in preventing workplace injuries and illnesses.


OSHA Guidelines for Employee Training

OSHA requires employers to provide training to employees on specific hazards and safety procedures relevant to their job functions.


Here are some of the OSHA guidelines for employee training:

  1. Training must be provided in a language and format that is understandable to the employees. This means that if employees are not proficient in English, the training must be provided in a language they understand.

  2. The training must be conducted by qualified trainers who have experience and knowledge in the subject matter. The trainers should be able to answer employee questions and provide additional information as needed.

  3. The training must cover the specific hazards and safety procedures relevant to the employee's job function. For example, if an employee works with hazardous chemicals, they must receive training on how to properly handle and store those chemicals.

  4. The training must be provided before employees are exposed to the hazards. In some cases, such as with new employees or new hazards, the training must be provided before work begins. In other cases, such as with changes to procedures or new hazards, the training must be provided as soon as possible after the change or hazard is identified.

  5. The training must be documented, including the date of the training, the topics covered, and the names of the employees who attended. The documentation should be kept on file and available for review by OSHA inspectors.

Online Resources for Building Your OSHA Training Program

There are many online resources available to help employers develop OSHA-compliant training programs. Here are a few options:


OSHA Training Institute Education Centers (OTIEC)

OTIECs provide training and education on OSHA standards and policies, as well as courses on specific hazards and best practices. These centers offer both online and in-person courses, and some even offer train-the-trainer courses.


OSHA Outreach Training Program

This program provides training for employees and employers on the recognition, avoidance, and prevention of workplace hazards. The program offers 10- and 30-hour courses in construction and general industry, and trainers who complete the program are authorized to conduct OSHA training.


OSHA eTools

These online resources provide guidance on specific hazards and best practices, including interactive training modules and checklists. The eTools cover a range of topics, from fall protection and electrical safety to ergonomics and hazard communication.


National Safety Council (NSC)

The NSC offers a variety of online courses and resources on workplace safety, including OSHA compliance training. Their courses cover topics such as lockout/tagout, confined space entry, and bloodborne pathogens.


American Safety Council

This organization offers a variety of online courses on workplace safety and compliance, including OSHA 10- and 30-hour courses for both general industry and construction. They also offer courses on specific hazards, such as respiratory protection and hazardous waste operations.


About LMS Portals

At LMS Portals, we provide our clients and partners with a SaaS-based, multi-tenant learning management system that allows you to launch a dedicated training environment (a portal) for each of your unique audiences.


The system includes an embedded course authoring tool that enables most anyone to build engaging courses quickly and easily.


If you choose to, you can create Learning Paths to deliver courses in a logical progression and add structure to your training program.


The system also supports Virtual Instructor-Led Training (VILT) and provides tools for online coaching and social learning.


Together, these features enable you to build a comprehensive OSHA training program for your employees.


Contact us today to get started or visit our Partner Program pages


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